14.2 C
London
Tuesday, August 3, 2021

When Community Engagement Restored Trust and Raised Public Index of Suspicion for COVID-19

Kampala, 4 September 2020:- When the World Health Organization (WHO), declared the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) outbreak a global pandemic, on 11th March 2020, many Ugandans didn’t take it seriously with many saying it was a disease for the affluent, the very high class or for developed countries. As the disease ravaged the entire world, Ugandans…
More

    Latest Posts

    Chromebooks set to suffer at the hands of Windows 11 laptops

    Home News Computing (Image credit: Foxy burrow / Shutterstock / Microsoft) Chromebooks are set to feel the pinch, as while these Chrome OS-powered portables are still selling well right now, PC manufacturers are purportedly planning to favor the production of Windows laptops which generate more profit going forward as the global component shortage remains a…

    Roku TVs and streaming devices are getting a massive movie overhaul

    Home News Televisions (Image credit: Roku) Roku is about to benefit from a whole lot more movies and TV shows thanks to a merger between Vudu and FandangoNOW that will see the former become the official entertainment store on the popular streaming platform.Fandango Media, a subsidiary of NBCUniversal, has announced its plans to make Vudu…

    Wait… that IP address finder may not be as privacy-friendly as you think

    Home News Computing (Image credit: Shutterstock) Finding out whether your VPN service is working is really easy: just point your browser at a specialist IP finder like WhatIsMyIP.com or WhatIsMyIPAddress.com and in a second or two they'll display your current IP address and location.Simple. Straightforward. But maybe not the most privacy-friendly of ideas.The big-name location…

    Peaky Blinders season 6: everything we know so far

    Home News Entertainment Peaky Blinders season 6 is highly anticipated, after season 5's cliffhanger ending left viewers screaming for answers. After a long pandemic-induced delay, filming on Peaky Blinders season 6 wrapped up in May 2021, with a release date now predicted for early 2022. This will be the final season of BBC's period drama, but…

    Is the ‘hardliner’ talking point about Iran’s Raisi a whitewash?

    A global narrative among major media outlets uses the term “hardliner” to describe Ebrahim Raisi, the winner of Iran’s presidential election announced Saturday.

    The term “hardliner” was invented by major media to describe the far-right in Iran. It is generally not used to describe any other form of politics in the world. For instance, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Japan, Spain or the Congo don’t have “hardliners” – only Iran.

    Does the term accurately describe Iran’s far-right extremist theocratic leaders, or is it used to whitewash and excuse Iran’s politics, the way “militants” is used to describe extremist groups that mass murder civilians?

    Major media that use the term “hardliner” also explain to the readers what it means – sometimes. The BBC notes that “Iran’s hardliners will seek to reinforce a puritanical system of Islamic government, possibly meaning more controls on social activities, fewer freedoms and jobs for women, and tighter control of social media and the press. The hardliners are suspicious of the West, but both Raisi and Supreme Leader Khamenei favor a return to an international deal on Iran’s nuclear activity.”

    BBC’s headline on June 19 was that “hardliner Raisi will become president.”

    CNN also says that Raisi is the “hardliner” who will be the next president. However, CNN’s headline also calls him “ultraconservative.”

    The article notes that “From 2018 onwards, [former President Donald] Trump unleashed a torrent of sanctions that crippled Iran’s economy and emboldened hardliners. The tiny window of opportunity granted by the clerical class to the moderate government of President Rouhani to engage with the US and Europe began to quickly close. Trump had proven the hardliners’ skepticism about the West correct, Iran’s conservatives repeatedly said.”

    According to France24, Raisi is an “ultra-conservative” who is replacing a “reformist” in the current President Hassan Rouhani. Under Rouhani, people were persecuted for not covering their hair, for protesting, and for other minor offenses. A well-known wrestler was murdered under Rouhani’s supposed “reform” leadership. Foreign tourists were kidnapped and kept in prison. Journalists and dissidents were hunted down abroad. CBS also calls Raisi a hardliner, as does Turkey’s TRT.

    With the term “hardliner” cemented as the only normative term that can be used to describe Raisi, it is worth wondering what else is going on.

    Is there any substantial difference between the regime under the “hardliners” than under the “reformers”?

    IRAN ALLOWS some diversity of thought. Its media has more interesting stories than the totally totalitarian media in Turkey, where only pro-AKP views are aired on state media and where criticism of the president can land people in prison.

    Iran’s regime is more open than the regimes Iran supports in Damascus and the thugs it supports among Hezbollah and the Houthis, as well as militias in Iraq.

    However, Raisi may be even worse than what Iran has seen in the past. On June 19, Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch said that “Ebrahim Raisi’s election as Iran’s new president was a blow for human rights and called for him to be investigated over his role in what Washington and rights groups have called the extrajudicial executions of thousands of political prisoners in 1988,” according to Reuters.

    It looks like Raisi is not just a “hardliner” or “conservative” but was responsible for mass murder. That would put him on par with other murderous regime leaders. Accusations of crimes against humanity are not usual for a ruler of a country.

    Amnesty noted that, “in 2018, our organization documented how Ebrahim Raisi had been a member of the ‘death commission’ which forcibly disappeared and extrajudicially executed in secret thousands of political dissidents in Evin and Gohardasht prisons near Tehran in 1988.” This sounds like a lot more than just “hardliner.”

    THE REASON the term “hardliner” was invented was largely as a foil for narratives in the West. The Western countries needed the far-right extremist Iranian regime that hangs innocent people to have a good side, so “reformers” were conjured up.

    Then “hardliners” were said to oppose them. But the reality was that Iran’s regime, run by Ayatollah Khamenei and the IRGC, was already one of the most extremist regimes in the world.

    But Western governments wanted to make a deal with it in the run-up to the 2015 JCPOA. To do this, a narrative was created – through focus groups and various lobbying groups that were close to governments and media – to push narratives about the so-called “Iran Deal” and the need to “empower moderates.”

    This created a narrative whereby anyone opposing the Iran deal was “empowering hardliners” by not giving Iran’s regime everything it wanted.

    It didn’t matter if Iran’s regime was imprisoning people and giving them “lashes” for music videos or kidnapping Western tourists and accusing them of spying for no reason other than to use them as hostages – the regime had “moderates” and “hardliners.”

    During the Trump era, the narrative worked to portray him as “empowering hardliners.” When the Biden administration came into office, there were attempts to argue that the administration should rush back to the Iran deal or the “hardliners” might win the June elections. Now we have seen the “elections” in which basically only “hardliners” were allowed to run.

    It stands to reason that Iran has “hardliners” the way other countries do. Iran doesn’t exist on the moon; its politics are linked to those in Iraq, Lebanon and the rest of the region. It may be the only Shi’ite theocracy, but its version of political Islam is not so different from that of the supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood who run Turkey’s AKP.

    It is a “revolutionary” power, but largely in a reactionary way. This leaves many questions as to why it has “hardliners” while other countries often do not, at least consistently the way Iran’s politics is said to be divided.

    This brings to mind how Western countries are often said to have a “far right,” much as Israel has a “far right” – while in Lebanon, Turkey, Iraq, Pakistan or Malaysia there are fewer references to the “far right.”

    This is because Western media often lacks a lexicon to discuss non-Western political systems. In such cases, arbitrary terms like “hardliner” are used. This is in place of local terms.

    When it comes to Raisi it’s not clear if the term “hardliner” is enough to describe a man now potentially wanted for crimes against humanity.

    %

    Latest Posts

    Chromebooks set to suffer at the hands of Windows 11 laptops

    Home News Computing (Image credit: Foxy burrow / Shutterstock / Microsoft) Chromebooks are set to feel the pinch, as while these Chrome OS-powered portables are still selling well right now, PC manufacturers are purportedly planning to favor the production of Windows laptops which generate more profit going forward as the global component shortage remains a…

    Roku TVs and streaming devices are getting a massive movie overhaul

    Home News Televisions (Image credit: Roku) Roku is about to benefit from a whole lot more movies and TV shows thanks to a merger between Vudu and FandangoNOW that will see the former become the official entertainment store on the popular streaming platform.Fandango Media, a subsidiary of NBCUniversal, has announced its plans to make Vudu…

    Wait… that IP address finder may not be as privacy-friendly as you think

    Home News Computing (Image credit: Shutterstock) Finding out whether your VPN service is working is really easy: just point your browser at a specialist IP finder like WhatIsMyIP.com or WhatIsMyIPAddress.com and in a second or two they'll display your current IP address and location.Simple. Straightforward. But maybe not the most privacy-friendly of ideas.The big-name location…

    Peaky Blinders season 6: everything we know so far

    Home News Entertainment Peaky Blinders season 6 is highly anticipated, after season 5's cliffhanger ending left viewers screaming for answers. After a long pandemic-induced delay, filming on Peaky Blinders season 6 wrapped up in May 2021, with a release date now predicted for early 2022. This will be the final season of BBC's period drama, but…

    Don't Miss

    Telegram has a raft of updates

    Home News Internet (Image credit: Telegram) Just last month, Telegram rolled out its much-delayed group video call feature. And already it has come up with a raft of updates for video calling and video sharing. The biggest one is the feature to have 1,000 viewers in a group video call, even though the number of…

    Now streaming: best new TV shows & movies this week in Australia (Aug 2-8)

    Home News Entertainment (Image credit: Apple) With so many shows and movies to choose from on Australia's major streaming services, it can often be difficult to find the best new stuff to entertain yourself with each week. In an effort to make things easier, we've hand-picked the best new shows and movies to watch on Aussie…

    John Ratcliffe: China Olympics 2022 – COVID cover up by country’s leaders means they should forfeit games

    NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles! With the summer Olympics kicking off in Japan in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this is a good time to remember that in a matter of just six months, another Olympic Games is scheduled to take place in Beijing, where the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)…

    UNC donors slammed creeping ‘Marxism’ amid debate over tenure for Nikole Hannah-Jones, emails show

    During its monthslong debate over bringing in 1619 Project writer Nikole Hannah-Jones as a tenured professor, donors slammed the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill for allowing "Marxism" to take root at the school, emails obtained by Fox News show.Hannah-Jones, the lead writer of The New York Times’ 1619 Project and a UNC alumna, was initially offered a multi-year…

    US gymnast Jade Carey takes Olympic gold in floor exercise final

    Jade Carey is the latest U.S. Olympic gymnast to win a gold medal.The 21-year-old put on a phenomenal performance during the floor routine final and finished with a score of 14.366 to win her first individual gold medal.CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COMShe finished ahead of Italy’s Vanessa Ferrari (14.200). Japan’s Mai Murakami…

    Stay in touch

    To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.

    × Share your content